FAA news

Today's Air Traffic Report:

Gusty winds could spur delays in the New York area (EWR, JFK, LGA) this afternoon, and thunderstorms may slow flights to and from Denver (DEN), Dallas-Fort Worth (DAL, DFW), Houston (HOU, IAH) and Phoenix (PHX). Low clouds, wind and rain may constrain flights in San Francisco (SFO).

For up-to-the-minute air traffic operations information, visit fly.faa.gov, and follow @FAANews on Twitter for the latest news and Air Traffic Alerts.

The FAA Air Traffic Report provides a reasonable expectation of any daily impactsto normal air traffic operations, i.e. arrival/departure delays, ground stoppages, airport closures. This information is for air traffic operations planning purposes and is reliable as weather forecasts and other factors beyond our ability to control.

Always check with your air carrier for flight-specific delay information.

April 12- The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has begun an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a new parallel runway and associated projects at Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT). Based on the FAAs most recent Terminal Area Forecast, the number of flights at CLT is expected to grow at an average rate of 1.9 percent annually, increasing from more than 545,000 operations in 2016 to a projected 740,000 operations in 2033.

Charlottes Airport Capacity Enhancement Plan recommends a 12,000-foot-long runway be completed by 2023. The preferred location for the new runway would be 1,480 feet west of the existing Runway 18/36 centerline. When the new runway is complete, CLT will have four parallel north/south runways. Runway 5/23 will be closed after the new runway is operational.

The initial phase of the EIS will identify reasonable alternatives in addition to the airports preferred alternative. The EIS also will study the effects on airport operations if a new runway is not built. The public will have several opportunities during the EIS process to provide input and make comments on the project. The FAA expects to complete the EIS in 2020.

The FAA previously gave the airport a $3.75 million Airport Improvement Program grant for the project. The total cost of the EIS will be determined after the scoping phase of the study is complete. The City of Charlotte, which operates the airport, will request the additional funding to support the EIS. The FAA selected VHB Engineering of Raleigh, NC to conduct the study.

The National Environmental Policy Act requires federal agencies to conduct an environmental review for airport development projects that result in changes to an Airport Layout Plan. The EIS enables federal agencies to analyze and document potentially significant environmental impacts from the proposed project and develop measures that will mitigate those effects.

The EIS for CLT will look at 14 categories of potential environmental impacts. These include aircraft noise and compatible land use, air quality, water resources, historic resources, and socioeconomic and environmental justice. The EIS will consider temporary, direct, secondary, and cumulative impacts for each category, as well.

For more information about Environmental Impact Statements, go to: http://www.faa.gov/airports/environmental/

April 11- DataComm, theNextGentechnology thatenhances safety and reduces delays by improving the way air traffic controllers and pilots talk to each other, is now live at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.

The new technology supplements radio voice communication, enabling controllers and pilots to transmit important information such as clearances, revised flight plans and advisories with the touch of a button.

Today, members of the media toured the Minneapolis-St. Paul air traffic control towerand a Delta Airlines jet to see Data Comm in action. Representatives from the FAA, Delta Airlines, the Metropolitan Airports Commission, National Air Traffic Controllers Association, and the Professional Aviation Safety Specialists were on hand.

Inside the tower, controllers enter flight departure clearance instructions into a computer and push a button to electronically send the information to an aircrafts flight deck. Flight crews read the information, press a button to confirm receipt, and press another button to enter the instructions into the aircrafts flight management system.

This process saves valuable time.For instance, when planes are awaiting take-off, controllers must use a two-way radio to issue instructions. Pilots must read those instructions back, and if there is an error, they must repeat the instructions until they are correct. This process can eat up valuable time, and even a short departure clearance can take two to three times longer than one communicated via Data Comm.

This benefit becomes even more pronounced during Minnesotas long winters and summer thunderstorms, when Data Comm enables equipped aircraft to take off before approaching weather closes the departure window, while aircraft relying solely on voice communications remain stuck on the ground waiting for the storm to pass.

Data Comm is expected to save operators more than $10 billion over the 30-year life cycle of the program and save the FAAabout $1 billion in future operating costs.

The first Data Comm-equipped airports Salt Lake City and Houstons George Bush Intercontinental and William P. Hobby received tower departure clearance services eight months ahead of schedule in August 2015.

DataCommis nowoperationalat the 55 air traffic control towerslisted below. Its rollout is under budget and more than two-and-a-half years ahead of schedule.That budget savings will enable the FAA to deploy DataCommat even more airports.

Albuquerque
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore-Washington
Boston
Burbank
Charlotte
Chicago OHare
Chicago Midway
Cleveland
Dallas-Ft. Worth
Dallas Love
Denver
Detroit
Fort Lauderdale
Houston Bush
Houston Hobby
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis-St. Paul
Milwaukee
Nashville
Newark
New Orleans
New York John F. Kennedy
New York LaGuardia
Oakland
Ontario
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland
Raleigh-Durham
Sacramento
San Juan
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
San Jose
Santa Ana
Seattle
Tampa
Teterboro
Washington Dulles
Washington Reagan
Westchester County
Windsor Locks (Bradley)

Amplify the news onTwitterandFacebookusing #FlyNextGen

April 11- DataComm, theNextGentechnology thatenhances safety and reduces delays by improving the way air traffic controllers and pilots talk to each other, is now live at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.

The new technology supplements radio voice communication, enabling controllers and pilots to transmit important information such as clearances, revised flight plans and advisories with the touch of a button.

Today, members of the media toured the Minneapolis-St. Paul air traffic control towerand a Delta Airlines jet to see Data Comm in action. Representatives from the FAA, Delta Airlines, the Metropolitan Airports Commission, National Air Traffic Controllers Association, and the Professional Aviation Safety Specialists were on hand.

Inside the tower, controllers enter flight departure clearance instructions into a computer and push a button to electronically send the information to an aircrafts flight deck. Flight crews read the information, press a button to confirm receipt, and press another button to enter the instructions into the aircrafts flight management system.

This process saves valuable time.For instance, when planes are awaiting take-off, controllers must use a two-way radio to issue instructions. Pilots must read those instructions back, and if there is an error, they must repeat the instructions until they are correct. This process can eat up valuable time, and even a short departure clearance can take two to three times longer than one communicated via Data Comm.

This benefit becomes even more pronounced during Minnesotas long winters and summer thunderstorms, when Data Comm enables equipped aircraft to take off before approaching weather closes the departure window, while aircraft relying solely on voice communications remain stuck on the ground waiting for the storm to pass.

Data Comm is expected to save operators more than $10 billion over the 30-year life cycle of the program and save the FAAabout $1 billion in future operating costs.

The first Data Comm-equipped airports Salt Lake City and Houstons George Bush Intercontinental and William P. Hobby received tower departure clearance services eight months ahead of schedule in August 2015.

DataCommis nowoperationalat the 55 air traffic control towerslisted below. Its rollout is under budget and more than two-and-a-half years ahead of schedule.That budget savings will enable the FAA to deploy DataCommat even more airports.

Albuquerque
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore-Washington
Boston
Burbank
Charlotte
Chicago OHare
Chicago Midway
Cleveland
Dallas-Ft. Worth
Dallas Love
Denver
Detroit
Fort Lauderdale
Houston Bush
Houston Hobby
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis-St. Paul
Milwaukee
Nashville
Newark
New Orleans
New York John F. Kennedy
New York LaGuardia
Oakland
Ontario
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland
Raleigh-Durham
Sacramento
San Juan
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
San Jose
Santa Ana
Seattle
Tampa
Teterboro
Washington Dulles
Washington Reagan
Westchester County
Windsor Locks (Bradley)

Amplify the news onTwitterandFacebookusing #FlyNextGen

April 10- The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) plans to release the first set of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) facility maps on April 27. The maps will depict areas and altitudes near airports where UAS may operate safely. They will help drone operators improve the quality of their Part 107 airspace authorization requests and will help the FAA process these requests more quickly.

Beginning April 27, users may access the facility maps at http://www.faa.gov/uas. Users will be able to download the data in several formats, view the site on mobile devices and customize their views.

By referring to the facility maps when completing airspace authorization applications, remote pilots will be able to tailor their requests to align with locations and altitudes that the maps indicate are likely to be approved for small UAS operations. This will help simplify the process and increase the likelihood that the FAA will approve their requests.

FAA air traffic personnel will use the maps to process Part 107 airspace authorization requests. Altitudes that exceed what are depicted on the maps require additional safety analysis and coordination to determine if an application can be approved.

The maps will be informational only. They do not automatically authorize flights. Remote pilots must still submit online airspace authorization applications at https://www.faa.gov/uas/. The maps also do not guarantee approval for requests within the guidelines indicated by the maps. Only the FAA can grant controlled airspace access, which must be done through the authorization process.

The agency is releasing the maps in phases, with the first release on April 27 containing approximately 200 facility maps, as the first step in streamlining the airspace authorization process. The FAA plans to release facility maps over the next 12 months. Updates to the maps database will coincide with the agencys existing 56-day aeronautical chart production schedule. If a map is not yet available, it can be expected in future releases.

The FAAs website will be updated within the several weeks with additional guidance and information about the facility maps.Visit www.faa.gov/uas on April 27, 2017 to view the facility maps.

Additional questions may be directed to the FAA's UAS Integration Office via uashelp@faa.gov or by calling 844-FLY-MY-UA.

April 10- The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) plans to release the first set of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) facility maps on April 27. The maps will depict areas and altitudes near airports where UAS may operate safely. They will help drone operators improve the quality of their Part 107 airspace authorization requests and will help the FAA process these requests more quickly.

Beginning April 27, users may access the facility maps at http://www.faa.gov/uas. Users will be able to download the data in several formats, view the site on mobile devices and customize their views.

By referring to the facility maps when completing airspace authorization applications, remote pilots will be able to tailor their requests to align with locations and altitudes that the maps indicate are likely to be approved for small UAS operations. This will help simplify the process and increase the likelihood that the FAA will approve their requests.

FAA air traffic personnel will use the maps to process Part 107 airspace authorization requests. Altitudes that exceed what are depicted on the maps require additional safety analysis and coordination to determine if an application can be approved.

The maps will be informational only. They do not automatically authorize flights. Remote pilots must still submit online airspace authorization applications at https://www.faa.gov/uas/. The maps also do not guarantee approval for requests within the guidelines indicated by the maps. Only the FAA can grant controlled airspace access, which must be done through the authorization process.

The agency is releasing the maps in phases, with the first release on April 27 containing approximately 200 facility maps, as the first step in streamlining the airspace authorization process. The FAA plans to release facility maps over the next 12 months. Updates to the maps database will coincide with the agencys existing 56-day aeronautical chart production schedule. If a map is not yet available, it can be expected in future releases.

The FAAs website will be updated within the several weeks with additional guidance and information about the facility maps.Visit www.faa.gov/uas on April 27, 2017 to view the facility maps.

Additional questions may be directed to the FAA's UAS Integration Office via uashelp@faa.gov or by calling 844-FLY-MY-UA.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is using its existing authority under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) 99.7 Special Security Instructions to address national security concerns about unauthorized drone operations over 133 military facilities.

This is the first time the agency has instituted airspace restrictions that specifically apply only to unmanned aircraft, popularly known as drones. The authority under 99.7 is limited to requests based on national security interests from the Department of Defense and U.S. federal security and intelligence agencies.

U.S. military facilities are vital to the nations security. The FAA and the Department of Defense have agreed to restrict drone flights up to 400 feet within the lateral boundaries of these 133 facilities. The restrictions will be effective April 14, 2017.There are only a few exceptions that permit drone flights within these restrictions, and they must be coordinated with the individual facility and/or the FAA.

Operators who violate the airspace restrictions may be subject to enforcement action, including potential civil penalties and criminal charges.

To ensure the public is aware of these restricted locations, the FAA has created an interactive map online. The link to these restrictions is also included in the FAAs B4UFLY mobile app. The app will be updated within 60 days to reflect these airspace restrictions. Additional information, including frequently asked questions, is available on the FAAs UAS website.

Section 2209 of the FAA Extension, Safety, and Security Act of 2016 also directs the Secretary of Transportation to establish a process to accept petitions to prohibit or restrict UAS operations over critical infrastructure and other facilities. The Department of Transportation and the FAA are currently evaluating options to implement such a process.

The FAA is considering additional requests from federal security and intelligence agencies for restrictions using the FAAs 99.7 authority as they are received.

Amplify the news on Twitter and Facebook using #FlySafe.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is using its existing authority under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) 99.7 Special Security Instructions to address national security concerns about unauthorized drone operations over 133 military facilities.

This is the first time the agency has instituted airspace restrictions that specifically apply only to unmanned aircraft, popularly known as drones. The authority under 99.7 is limited to requests based on national security interests from the Department of Defense and U.S. federal security and intelligence agencies.

U.S. military facilities are vital to the nations security. The FAA and the Department of Defense have agreed to restrict drone flights up to 400 feet within the lateral boundaries of these 133 facilities. The restrictions will be effective April 14, 2017.There are only a few exceptions that permit drone flights within these restrictions, and they must be coordinated with the individual facility and/or the FAA.

Operators who violate the airspace restrictions may be subject to enforcement action, including potential civil penalties and criminal charges.

To ensure the public is aware of these restricted locations, the FAA has created an interactive map online. The link to these restrictions is also included in the FAAs B4UFLY mobile app. The app will be updated within 60 days to reflect these airspace restrictions. Additional information, including frequently asked questions, is available on the FAAs UAS website.

Section 2209 of the FAA Extension, Safety, and Security Act of 2016 also directs the Secretary of Transportation to establish a process to accept petitions to prohibit or restrict UAS operations over critical infrastructure and other facilities. The Department of Transportation and the FAA are currently evaluating options to implement such a process.

The FAA is considering additional requests from federal security and intelligence agencies for restrictions using the FAAs 99.7 authority as they are received.

Amplify the news on Twitter and Facebook using #FlySafe.

March 30- The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and General Aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign aims to educate GA pilots on the best practices to calculate and predict aircraft performance and to operate within established aircraft limitations.

Message from FAA Administrator Michael P. Huerta:
The FAA and industry are working together to prevent Loss of Control (LOC) accidents and save lives. You can help make a difference by joining our #FlySafe campaign. Each month on FAA.gov, we provide pilots with a Loss of Control solution developed by a team of experts. They have studied the data and developed solutions some of which are already reducing risk. We hope you will join us in this effort and spread the word. Follow #FlySafe on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. I know that we can reduce these accidents by working together as a community.

What is Loss of Control?
An LOC accident involves an unintended departure of an aircraft from controlled flight. LOC can happen because the aircraft enters a flight regime that is outside its normal flight envelope and may quickly develop into a stall or spin. It can introduce an element of surprise for the pilot.

Maneuvering Flight: Low-Level Safety
This month were focused on how to maintain safety during the maneuvering phase of flight: during take-off, landing, and while you are maneuvering in the traffic pattern. Other examples of maneuvering flight include aerobatics formation flight, turns around a point, and aerial application.

Did You Know:

  • Maneuvering flight accidents can result in fatalities, serious injuries lost wages, severe damage to the aircraft, insurance claims, and lawsuits.
  • More than 25 percent of general aviation fatal accidents occur during these flightsbelow 1000 feet Above Ground Level (AGL).
  • Most of these accidents involve stall/spin scenarios and buzzing attempts.
  • Many occur before youve left the traffic pattern.

Relative Wind and Angle of Attack
Pilots learn during flight training that the relative wind is opposite the direction of flight.

  • Any discussion of relative wind should include Angle of Attack (AoA), the angle between the chord line of the wing and the relative wind.
  • When the aircraft exceeds its critical angle of attack, it will stall in nose-up and nose-down flight attitudes.

Training and technology are available to help pilots avoid exceeding the critical AoA. An AoA indicator warns when you are about to exceed a wings lift capacity. Consider adding one to your safety toolkit!

Stalls/Spins
A pilot can stall at any flight attitude and airspeed. However, most fatal stall/spin accidents occur at low altitudes, when recovery is unlikely.

  • Stay safe by practicing stalls, or approaches to stalls, at a safe altitude with an experienced instructor.
  • Remember that turns, either vertical or horizontal, load the wings and increase the stall speed dramatically.
  • Be aware of how stall/spins happen and how you can get out of them.

Traffic Pattern Rules
In the pattern, youre flying at low altitudes, low airspeeds and high angles of attack. Know your aircrafts limitations and remember these simple rules:

  • Base to final: Cheating on the turn after overshooting final is very dangerous. Keep a normal turn going. If the approach is not salvageable once you roll out, go around!
  • Stabilized approach: Airline crews stop maneuvering 1,000 feet above when on approach for landing. For lighter aircraft, 500 feet could be the maneuvering hard deck. This means the flight is on airspeed, at the right altitude, with the appropriate descent rate and aligned with the runway. Not stable on approach? Go around!
  • Before-landing checklist: Complete your checklist, with the possible exceptions of landing flaps and props full forward before turning base. If you are interrupted, run the checklist again. Its better to take your time than to miss an important item. Dont have time? Go around!

Target Fixation
Each pilot has practiced turns around a point to build skill in wind compensation, aircraft ground track control, orientation, and division of attention.

However, you will increase your risk for stalls if you do this maneuver while close to the ground. They are called moose stalls in Alaska and coyote stalls in Arizona because the pilot is focused more on the target point than flying the aircraft. Bottom line: focus on your flying, and not an object outside of the cockpit!

Formation Flying
Its critical that you know the skills of the pilot next to you. A miscommunication or lack of skill can be deadly. Practice, practice, practice before attempting this type of maneuver.

Buzzing
Buzzing over your friends house to show off your plane or flying skills is NEVER a good idea. Its reckless, and could lead to a violent AoA stall. Buzzing accidents account for many maneuvering accidents and are preventable. No amount of skill will allow recovery from a spin below 1000 feet. Be safe and dont do a buzzing stunt!

Canyon Flying
Experienced mountain pilots are trained to fly in canyon conditions, are familiar with the terrain, and make sure they always have an out. Following a river at low altitude, with terrain on either side, can turn into a dangerous situation. Surprises can be around the next bend including wires, hills, or another aircraft. If your aircraft is not capable of making a 180-degree turn in the confines of the canyon, dont go there. Do not fly below canyon rims!

More about Loss of Control
Contributing factors may include:

  • Poor judgment or aeronautical decision making
  • Failure to recognize an aerodynamic stall or spin and execute corrective action
  • Intentional failure to comply with regulations
  • Failure to maintain airspeed
  • Failure to follow procedure
  • Pilot inexperience and proficiency
  • Use of prohibited or over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, or alcohol

Did you know?

  • In 2015, 384 people died in 238 general aviation accidents.
  • Loss of Control was the number one cause of these accidents.
  • Loss of Control happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.
  • There is one fatal accident involving Loss of Control every four days.

Learn more:
Take the FAASTeam Online Course, Maneuvering: Approach and Landing.

Check out GA Safety Enhancements fact sheets on the mainFAA Safety Briefingwebsite, including Maneuvering Flight.

Be sure to check out the AOPA Safety Advisor, Maneuvering Flight-Hazardous to Your Health?

TheFAASafety.govwebsite has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars and more on key general aviation safety topics.

TheWINGS Pilot Proficiency Programhelps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements.It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

TheGeneral Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC)is comprised of government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

March 30- Speaking today before aviation leaders at the International Air Transport Association Wings of Change Conference at the first International Brazil Air Show (IBAS) in Rio de Janeiro, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Acting Deputy Administrator Victoria Wassmer said that the United States is proud to participate in a partnership with Brazil which enhances bilateral cooperation on airport expansion, airspace management, aviation safety, and security.

Acting Deputy Administrator Wassmer is attending IBAS and participating inmeetings with government and industry leaders from Latin America and around the world.

As traffic continues to increase between our countries, it is vital that operators are able to fly safely and seamlessly between our respective systems, said Acting Deputy Administrator Wassmer. By working together, the United States NextGen and Brazils Sirius programs are leading to safer, more efficient and environmentally friendly aviation systems in not only both countries but around theglobe.

The FAA and Brazil face many of the same issues to modernize air traffic management. These include the size of geographic area, civil-military coordination, vast spaces of remote airspace, congested terminal areas and a mature generalaviation industry. Together, the United States and Brazil have collaborated through ICAO to achieve a modernized, seamless global air traffic management system.To complement those efforts, Acting Deputy Administrator Wassmer and Brigadier-Major Carlos Aquino, Director, General of the Department of Air Space Control (DECEA) yesterday signed an agreement for joint U.S.-Brazil to implement Ground Based Augmentation Systems (GBAS) research and development. GBAS is an alternative to the traditional Instrument Landing System (ILS) that is used to provide precision approach guidance down to the runway threshold at airports in near-zero visibility conditions.

Since 2013, the U.S.-Brazil Aviation Partnership has shared expertise through a series of workshops on airport design and construction, airport security, air traffic management, and airport certification. More than 1,200 aviation experts have participated.

Brazil has the worlds third largest aircraft manufacturer, Embraer S.A., and serves as a destination to more than seven percent of the annual outbound international traffic from theUnited States. Sirius is the new Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source which will be the countrys largest and most complex scientific infrastructure.

The FAAs Global Leadership Initiative is transforming how the FAA prioritizes and targets resources to engage with the international aviation community to improve safety, efficiency, and environmental sustainability through regulatory harmonization and partnerships.

Photo caption: FAA Acting Deputy Administrator Victoria Wassmer and U.S. Ambassador to Federative Republic of Brazil P. Michael McKinley attend the first Brazil International Air Show.

  • Amplify the news on Twitter using #FAA

Pages