FAA news

With the holiday season upon us, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)wants to make sure your laser-light displays are aimed at your house and not into the sky.

Each year we receive reports from pilots who are distracted or temporarily blinded by residential laser-light displays. You might not realize this, but a well-meaning attempt to spread holiday cheer has the potential to create a serious safety risk to pilots and their passengers flying overhead.

So please make sure all laser lights are directed at your house and not into the sky. The extremely concentrated beams of laser lights reach much farther than you might realize.

If we become aware that your laser-light display affects pilots, well ask you to adjust them or turn them off. If your laser-light display continues to affect pilots, despite our warnings, you could face a civil penalty.

Laser strikes against aircraft continue to increase each year. Last year we received 6,754 reports of laser strikes against aircraft, a 250 percent increase since we started tracking laser strikes in 2010.

Intentionally aiming a laser at an aircraft is a serious safety risk and violates federal law. Many high-powered lasers can completely incapacitate pilots who are trying to fly safely to their destinations and may be carrying hundreds of passengers.

We work with federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies to pursue civil and criminal penalties against individuals who purposely aim a laser at an aircraft. We may impose civil penalties of up to $11,000 per violation. Civil penalties of up to $30,800 have been imposed by the FAA against individuals for multiple laser incidents.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) will co-host the 4th Annual FAA Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Symposium on February 12-14, 2019 at the Baltimore Convention Center, Baltimore, MD.

This years Symposium is all about getting down to business. Come learn how the FAA is partnering with industry stakeholders to find the balance between safety and innovation in order to advance UAS integration. Attendees will hear directly from senior FAA officials, government agencies, industry and academia on how UAS challenges are being tackled today and what to expect in the future.

Back by popular demand, the FAA will provide an on-site resource center to answer your questions, including inquiries about airspace authorizations, waivers, the small UAS rule, and other policies and regulations.

Advanced UAS operations, including beyond visual line-of-sight (BVLOS), package delivery, and urban air mobility are the future. Dont miss the opportunity to learn about the latest developments that will help you take full advantage of the almost limitless opportunities the UAS world offers. Interest in the Symposium will be greater than ever, so register now!

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is developing new flight paths for aircraft flying over Central and South Florida. The project is called South-Central Florida Metroplex and the Agency will ask the public for input as it develops the new air traffic control procedures.

We will involve the public as we design the new procedures, and conduct the required environmental review, said Michael OHarra, Regional Administrator for the FAA Southern Region. Early next year we will hold public meetings across Central and South Florida. We encourage the public to attend the workshops to talk with experts, learn how proposed changes could affect their communities and provide comments that we will consider as we finalize the new procedures.

The South-Central Florida Metroplex proposes to replace dozens of existing air traffic procedures with more direct and efficient satellite-based routes into and out of major airports, enhancing safety and efficiency. The new satellite-based procedures are a key component of the FAAs Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). Metroplex initiatives are complete or are underway in 11 metropolitan areas across the country.

TheNational Environmental Policy Act of 1969(NEPA) requires the FAA to identify and publicly disclose any potential environmental impacts of the proposed procedures. The Agency plans to begin the environmental review in spring 2019. We will offer the public the opportunity to comment on the proposal during the environmental review.

As we confirm locations, dates and times of the meetings, we will post them on our Community Involvement webpage. We also will publicize the meetings through news media and the FAAs social media platforms: Facebook, Instagram and LinkedInFederal Aviation Administration; Twitter@FAANews.

General Aviation pilots who want to fly around Atlanta between Jan. 29 and Feb. 5, 2019, will want to check out the FAAs Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) for air traffic procedures for the area. Super Bowl LIII is Sunday, Feb. 3, at Mercedes-Benz Stadium. Game time will be at 6:30 p.m. EST. The FAA has published a webpage with information for Atlanta-area airspace and airports. The Agency will update the webpage as additional information becomes available.

As a designated National Security Special Event, additional unmanned aircraft restrictions will be in place before, during and after the Super Bowl. Learn more here: Super Bowl LIII is a No Drone Zone.

A reservation program to facilitate ground services at the following participating Atlanta metropolitan airports will be in effect from January 29 through February 5. Pilots should contact the Fixed Base Operator (FBO) at their destination to obtain reservations and additional information.

  • Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL)
  • DeKalb-Peachtree Airport (PDK)
  • Fulton County Airport-Brown Field (FTY)
  • Cobb County International Airport-McCollum Field (RYY)
  • Gwinnett County Airport-Briscoe Field (LZU)
  • Newnan Coweta County Airport (CCO)
  • Paulding Northwest Atlanta Airport (PUJ
  • Atlanta Regional Airport-Falcon Field (FFC)
  • Henry County Airport (HMP)
  • Griffin-Spalding County Airport (6A2)
  • Covington Municipal Airport (CVC)
  • Cartersville Airport (VPC)
  • West Georgia Regional Airport-O V Gray Field (CTJ)
  • Cherokee County Regional Airport (CNI)
  • Athens-Ben Epps Airport (AHN)
  • Barrow County Airport (WDR)
  • Lee Gilmer Memorial Airport (GVL)
  • Jackson County Airport (JCA)
  • Thomaston-Upson County Airport (OPN)
  • Lagrange-Callaway Airport (LGC)
  • Harris County Airport (PIM)
  • Columbus Airport (CSG)
  • Auburn University Regional Airport (AUO)
  • Polk County Airport Cornelius Moore Field (4A4)

Special air traffic procedures to minimize air traffic delays and enhance safety will be in effect for the following airports:

  • Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL)
  • DeKalb-Peachtree Airport (PDK)
  • Fulton County Airport-Brown Field (FTY)
  • Cobb County International Airport-McCollum Field (RYY)
  • Gwinnett County Airport-Briscoe Field (LZU)
  • Newnan Coweta County Airport (CCO)
  • Paulding Northwest Atlanta Airport (PUJ)
  • Atlanta Regional Airport-Falcon Field (FFC)
  • Henry County Airport (HMP)
  • Griffin-Spalding County Airport (6A2)
  • Covington Municipal Airport (CVC)

Arrival and Departure Route Requirements: Jan. 29 12 p.m. (1700z) through Feb. 5 12 p.m. (1700z)

The NOTAM includes specific arrival and departure route requirements for jet and turboprop aircraft.

FAA ATC Air Traffic Management Initiatives

Air traffic management initiatives may be implemented may include:

  • Ground Delay Programs (GDP)
  • Airspace Flow Programs (AFP)
  • Time Based Metering
  • Miles in Trail
  • Airborne Holding
  • Ground Stops

Special Event TFR for Super Bowl Sunday February 3, 2019

The FAA will publish a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) for Super Bowl LIII centered on Mercedes-Benz Stadium. At this time, we expect the TFR will be active from 4 p.m. EST (2100z) until 11:59 p.m. EST (0459z) on Sunday, February 3. The TFR will have a 10-nautical- mile inner core and a 30-nautical-mile outer ring.

The TFR will not affect regularly scheduled commercial flights flying in and out of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL). Emergency medical, public safety and military aircraft may enter the TFR in coordination with air traffic control.

The FAA will post the full text and graphic depiction of the Super Bowl LIII TFR in January.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign helps educate GA pilots about the best practices to calculate and predict aircraft performance and to operate within established aircraft limitations.

A Loss of Control (LOC) accident involves an unintended departure of an aircraft from controlled flight. LOC can happen when the aircraft enters a flight regime that is outside its normal flight envelope and quickly develops into a stall or spin. It can introduce an element of surprise for the pilot.

Why Should I Monitor?
Well, I thought I could do that. If you are lucky enough to survive an accident and make that statement, you are very fortunate indeed.

Accident investigators say a pilots unrealistic expectation of the aircrafts performance, especially when that aircraft operates at the edge of its weight and balance capabilities cause some accidents.

Dont be fooled. The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) Loss of Control Work Group suggests every pilot will benefit by understanding how to calculate aircraft performance.

Lets have a look.

How Do You Monitor Your GA Aircrafts Performance?
Most GA aircraft do not have the dedicated automated flight data recording devices that the commercial operators have, but there are other ways to monitor performance.

Today, some manufacturers are offering self-contained flight data and visual data recorders for GA airplanes and helicopters.

But, even without dedicated equipment, pilots can track engine power, fuel flow, oil temperature and pressure:

  • Panel-mounted GPS systems and many hand-held units are capable of recording position, heading, speed, and altitude.
  • Engine monitors may have recording capability.
  • Oil analysis will gauge engine health, and, more importantly, prevent potentially catastrophic failures.
  • Some aircraft, especially helicopters, are equipped with chip detectors that can forecast engine and transmission failures in time for a safe landing.

Three Important Questions
When we talk about aircraft performance, were looking at three basic needs:

  • How much can I haul?
  • How far can I go?
  • How long will it take me to get to my destination?

These arent simple questions, because you, the pilot, have to consider a few variables before you arrive at an answer.

Start with the Basics

  • When planning a flight, decide how much weight you want to haul, and where you want to take it.
    -Start with the crew and passengers, then, add cargo. If you have already exceeded your aircrafts capability, youll have to trim the passenger count, reduce the cargo, make multiple trips, or get a bigger aircraft.
  • Next, youll need to figure out how much fuel you can take, and after you consult the weather, youll figure out how far you can go.
    - If you have enough fuel to get to your destination plus an alternate airport, plus reserve, youre good.
  • Next, run a weight-and-balance calculation to make sure youre operating within the weight and balance limitations of your aircraft.
  • Think about takeoff and landing.
    - Consider your departure and arrival airport runway lengths, obstructions, and expected density altitude.
    - If the field is short and/or obstructed, you may not be able to fly safely with a full load.
  • Last, but far from least, make sure YOU are up to the task. Pilot skill and experience count for a lot.
    - Be conservative when you calculate your performance and consider adding a safety factor.
    - Some pilots add 50-percent to their takeoff and landing calculations for safety.

Yes, YOU Are the Most Important Variable
Now, its all up to you. The calculations wont mean much if you, the pilot, cant duplicate them in your flying.

Thats why its critical that you document your personal performance capability at least once a year with your flight instructor.

Fly at a typical mission weight, and try to duplicate or simulate mission density altitudes. This exercise will help you become familiar with what you and your aircraft can do.

Finally, be sure to establish a baseline performance level for both you and your aircraft. Be aware that factors like fatigue (physical) or high-density altitude (environmental) can often result in performance below this baseline. On the flip side, proficiency training and lighter loading can often mean performance above this baseline.

Bottom line: know your limitations and always assess (and reassess) how you and your aircraft will perform on any given flight.

More about Loss of Control:
Contributing factors may include:

  • Poor judgment or aeronautical decision making
  • Failure to recognize an aerodynamic stall or spin and execute corrective action
  • Intentional failure to comply with regulations
  • Failure to maintain airspeed
  • Failure to follow procedure
  • Pilot inexperience and proficiency
  • Use of prohibited or over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, or alcohol

Did you know?

  • From October 2016 through September 2017, 247 people died in 209 general aviation accidents.
  • Loss of Control was the number one cause of these accidents.
  • Loss of Control happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.
  • There is one fatal accident involving Loss of Control every four days.

Learn more:
Check out the GA Safety Enhancement fact sheet onEngine Maintenance and Performance Monitoring. You can also learn more about the important steps you need to take after youve serviced your airplane with our fact sheet onAdvanced Preflight After Maintenance. A full list of fact sheets is available atwww.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing.

Learn how to debunk performance myths by readingUrban Air Legendsin the May/June 2015 edition of theFAA Safety Briefing.

Advisory Circular 120-113,Best Practices for Engine Time in Service Interval Extensionsgives the regulatory requirements for time limitations and time in service intervals for engine overhauls.

Read Chapter 8,Inspection Fundamentalsin theFAA Aviation Maintenance Technician Handbook.

Time is getting short!!The FAAs Equip ADS-B website gives you the information you need to equip now.

Curious about FAA regulations (Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations)? Its a good idea to stay on top of them. You can find current FAA regulations on this website.

TheFAASafety.govwebsite has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars, and more on key general aviation safety topics.

TheWINGS Pilot Proficiency Programhelps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements. WINGS is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

TheGeneral Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC)is comprised of government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

Getting a drone for the holidays? The Federal Aviation Administrations (FAA) Buzzy the Drone will help you learn the dos and don'ts of being a responsible drone operator and flying your new purchase safely.

Too many times, we at the FAA hear sad stories about what happens when inexperienced flyers take their drone out for its first flight. Sometimes a nasty tree will jump right into your flight path. All too often, the drone gets scared and flies away if you let it out of your sight. And upset neighbors may knock on your door if you fly over their backyard while theyre outside.

Buzzy, a whimsical four-rotor drone, can help you avoid being that guy or girl. Buzzy uses simple but effective rhymes to convey important safety tips, such as:

When Buzzy Goes Out for a Flight, the Number One Rule Is Keep Buzzy in Sight.

You can follow Buzzys adventures on FAA social media such as Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

Buzzys messages are the latest in the FAAs continuing efforts to make sure everyone follows the rules for safe drone operations. You can find details on the Agencys extensive unmanned aircraft website.

Buzzy and all the other drones say thanks in advance for keeping them safe, sound, and above the ground!

December 3-Today, Space Exploration (SpaceX) Technologies Corp.s launch, licensed by the FAA, broke new ground in the reusability of space vehicles and contained literally a number of firsts.

It represents the largest single rideshare mission from a U.S.-based launch vehicle to date. In addition, for the first time SpaceX launched the same refurbished booster for a third time.

Dubbed Spaceflight Small Sat Express, the mission delivered 64 payloads known as cube communication satellites to low earth orbit.

The launch took place from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. This is new record-setting year for commercial space transportation with a total 29 FAA-licensed launches.

If you are an experienced air traffic controller who would like to join the FAAs ranks, the agency is now accepting applications nationwide beginning Dec. 3 through Dec. 9, 2018.

Following are qualifications for experienced controllers:

  • United States citizenship
  • No older than 35 years of age (with special exceptions)
  • The announcement is open to candidates who have maintained at least 52 consecutive weeks of air traffic control experience involving the full-time active separation of air traffic. The candidate must have an air traffic control certification or facility ratingwithin five yearsof application while serving at any of the following:
  • an FAA air traffic control facility
  • a civilian or military air traffic control facility of the Department of Defense
  • a tower operating under contract with the FAA under section 47124

Depending on the nature of an applicants previous experience as an air traffic controller, other qualifications may be required for employment.See the full application for employment on https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/518366000.

Applicants must be willing to work at any FAA air traffic facility, and may be required to attend specialized training at the FAA Academy in Oklahoma City.

Active-duty service members will receive tentative veterans preference if they submit a document from the armed forces certifying that within 120 days they are expected to be discharged or released from active-duty service under honorable conditions and their application shows that they have the required service. They must provide to the Servicing Human Resource Management Office a DD Form 214 documenting discharge/release and showing that the service was honorable or general. Veterans on terminal leave must provide documentation certifying authorized terminal leave.

Interested applicants should visithttps://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/518366000. Or the FAA, visitwww.faa.gov/Jobs for more information about air traffic controllers.

3:30 pm ET Update

The FAA is now departing some aircraft from Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport. However, a groundstop remains in effect for arrivals.

Please Check with your airline and the airport for more information.

The FAA has implemented a groundstop for flights into Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport as a result of this mornings earthquake.

Travelers should check with their airline for flight status. We do not yet know when flights into Anchorage will resume.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign helps educate GA pilots about the best practices to calculate and predict aircraft performance and to operate within established aircraft limitations.

A Loss of Control (LOC) accident involves an unintended departure of an aircraft from controlled flight. LOC can happen when the aircraft enters a flight regime that is outside its normal flight envelope and quickly develops into a stall or spin. It can introduce an element of surprise for the pilot.

A Continuing Problem
The NTSB calls it the problem that never went away. CFIT or Controlled Flight Into Terrain continues to claim up to 17 percent of all general aviation fatalities, even though many pilots have technologies on their side.

CFIT occurs when an airworthy aircraft, under pilot control, flies into the ground, a mountain, a body of water, or an obstacle. Most often, the pilot or crew is unaware of the looming disaster until it is too late. CFIT most commonly occurs in the approach or landing phase of flight.

Accidents where the aircraft is out of control at the point of impact are not known as CFIT. Rather, they are considered uncontrolled flight into terrain. Similarly, incidents resulting from deliberate acts, such as terrorism or suicide by the pilot, are not considered to be CFIT.

Why Does CFIT Happen?
There are many reasons why a plane might crash into terrain, but pilot error is the most common, particularly a loss of situational awareness. A pilot may not know what his or her actual position is, and how that position relates to the surrounding terrain. Fatigue can cause very experienced pilots to make mistakes.

CFIT accidents often involve a collision with terrain which usually occurs during low visibility conditions and when the aircraft is on approach to a destination airport. Other contributing factors include weather, approach design and documentation, failure to use standard phraseology, and malfunctioning navigational aids.

GA Challenges
One of the problems in reviewing GA CFIT accidents is the lack of human factors data. This is due to the high fatality rate of CFIT accidents, and the fact that most GA aircraft are not equipped with data recording systems.

GA pilots have a unique challenge in that there is often only one pilot to conduct all of the flight and decision making duties. Unlike with a crewed cockpit, GA operations dont usually have a second pilot to help with avoiding a CFIT accident.

Therefore, it is vital that you as a single pilot, to ensure you are qualified for the intended flight, meet all regulatory requirements, and have the self-discipline to follow industry recommended safety procedures to minimize CFIT.

There are technologies that can help, including onboard alerting equipment. Air traffic control can act as an external warning too. However, external factors like fatigue, distraction, time pressure, procedural non-compliance, and more, can punch holes in your defense.

Realize that errors can happen, and layer redundancy into your operation. Verify your checklists, prepare for the unexpected. Fly rested, remain alert, undistracted, and focused on the operation. Dont become complacent about safety. Your loved ones will thank you.

More about Loss of Control:

Contributing factors may include:

  • Poor judgment or poor aeronautical decision making
  • Failure to recognize an aerodynamic stall or spin and execute corrective action
  • Intentional failure to comply with regulations
  • Failure to maintain airspeed
  • Failure to follow procedure
  • Pilot inexperience and proficiency
  • Use of prohibited or over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, or alcohol

Did you know?

  • From October 2016 through September 2017, 247 people died in 209 general aviation accidents.
  • Loss of Control was the number one cause of these accidents.
  • Loss of Control happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.
  • There is one fatal accident involving Loss of Control every four days.

Learn more:

This FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) Fact Sheet has more information about CFIT.

This FAA Advisory Circular discusses ways in which GA pilots can avoid CFIT.

This NTSB PowerPoint shows how you can overcome The Problem that Never Went Away.

This FAA Training Module can help you learn more about the causes of CFIT, and the ways to avoid it.

Time is getting short!!The FAAs Equip ADS-B website gives you the information you need to equip now.

Curious about FAA regulations (Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations)? Its a good idea to stay on top of them. You can find current FAA regulations on this website.

TheFAASafety.govwebsite has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars, and more on key general aviation safety topics.

TheWINGS Pilot Proficiency Programhelps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements. It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

TheGeneral Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC)is comprised of government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

Pages