AVweb Flash

  • The C-47 that led the Allied invasion into France on D-Day in 1944 is scheduled to fly for the first time in 10 years on Wednesday, Jan. 31, and the flight will be webcast live. The airplane, named That’s All, Brother, had been abandoned in a Wisconsin junkyard, till it was found by the Commemorative Air Force. Historian Matt Scales uncovered the airplane’s history, and the CAF led a fundraising effort to restore the airplane to flying condition.

  • The Wings Over the Rockies Air & Space Museum, in Denver, plans to open a new campus this summer at Centennial Airport, called Exploration of Flight. The 18,000-square-foot Boeing Blue Sky Gallery will be adjacent to an active flight ramp, giving visitors a chance to experience what real aviation is all about, while exploring interactive exhibits, including a flight simulator. Construction is now underway, with steel framing going up to support the galleries.

  • Aircraft owners who have gone through the process of upgrading for ADS-B, and applied for the FAA’s $500 rebate, must submit all their paperwork by Feb. 15 to complete their claim. After the equipment is installed, the aircraft must be flown in ADS-B-controlled airspace before receiving the rebate. That flight must last at least 30 minutes, including 10 minutes of maneuvering flight.

  • Authorities in India are investigating whether a kite string caused the crash of a powered parachute, killing the pilot and injuring his passenger.

  • The U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) rejected almost 300 percent duties against Bombardier's CSeries airliners in an unexpected ruling on Friday.

  • Five years ago, one strain of conventional wisdom predicted that the demise of the Third Class medical would equal the demise of the light sport aircraft market, too. With BasicMed firmly entrenched, the reality is proving more mixed according to an AVweb canvass of the flight line at the Sport Aviation Expo in Sebring this week.

  • Now that it’s out of receivership and ramping up production, Flight Design General Aviation is turning its attention to the long-awaited C4 certified four-place aircraft. But as time has marched forward since the airplane was announced eight years ago, so has technology.

  • Rotax is about ready to roll out its new 912 iS engine and it will soon be available in uncertified form as a powerplant choice for experimental amateur built aircraft and high-performance LSAs. At 141 HP max for five minutes and 135 HP continuous, the Rotax 915 iS occupies a unique niche for factory-provided engines.

  • If the universe lacks for not having a midnight-red Tesla Roadster orbiting Mars, SpaceX is about to set things right. This week the company assembled its massive Falcon Heavy booster on Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center for what's planned to be the first launch of the most powerful booster since the Saturn 5 moon missions launched from the same pad.

  • The 14th annual U.S. Sport Aviation Expo in Sebring, Florida, caught a break from the weather Wednesday and opened under clear skies and light winds. Show organizers told AVweb that both exhibitor participation and pre-show ticket sales are up over last year’s numbers. Moreover, the show grounds continue to get tweaks, including additions to the food court.

  • PBS will air a two-hour special about the round-the-world flight of Solar Impulse, premiering next Wednesday, Jan. 31. The documentary, “The Impossible Flight,” will follow the quest undertaken by Bertrand Piccard and André’s Borschberg as they tackle huge challenges, both technical and personal, in their mission to build the solar-powered airplane and fly it around the world. After years of development, the flight launched from Abu Dhabi, then landed back there more than a year later.

  • A one-of-a-kind modified double-hulled Yak-110 is coming to EAA AirVenture Oshkosh for the first time this summer, and will perform in the afternoon airshows, EAA has announced. The aerobatic airplane was created by attaching two Yak-55 fuselages together and adding a jet engine in addition to the two radial engines. “I can’t think of a better place to bring this airplane in its first year,” said Dell Coller, the primary builder of the aircraft.

  • Michael Huerta, who finished his term as FAA administrator early this month, has joined Macquarie Capital as a senior advisor, the firm has announced. "Michael has an exceptional reputation as a federal administrator in U.S. transportation,” said Nick Butcher, a leader of the Infrastructure and Energy Group at Macquarie. “His deep industry experience, relationships and insights will greatly benefit our clients and partners as we pursue initiatives in U.S. airport and other transportation infrastructure.”

  • Bell Helicopter responded this week to the NTSB’s recent report on the crash of a Bell 525 during a test flight in 2016. “In the time since the accident, a small team of Bell flight technology engineers, pilots and flight-test specialists have worked with the NTSB through the course of the investigation,” company spokesperson Blakeley Thress told AVweb in an email. “Several changes to the aircraft have been implemented and a carefully planned test approach is in place to complete the envelope expansion and certification testing.”

  • The glass cockpit retrofit market for King Airs has a new player as BendixKing announces the certification of its AeroVue flight deck for B200 aircraft.

  • Gulfstream Aerospace delivered its last G450 business jet last week, ending a 12-year production run. More than 360 of the jets have been delivered, collectively logging more than 964,000 hours and 461,000 flights. “The G450 made its mark in aviation history,” said Gulfstream President Mark Burns, in a news release. The company will continue to provide technical and engineering support and engineering for G450 customers, he added.

  • The FAA on Tuesday issued an Airworthiness Directive that affects nearly 19,000 Piper PA-128 airplanes, but compliance is fairly simple and cheap. The AD requires aircraft owners to inspect the fuel-tank selector cover to verify the fuel-tank selector placards are located at the proper positions. If not, the placards must be replaced. Piper told the FAA a “quality control issue” led to some of the placards being reversed. If the error goes unchecked, it could result in fuel-management errors, leading to fuel starvation and loss of power in flight, the FAA says.

  • The three-day government shutdown that ended Monday had limited impact on the aviation world, but it’s not over yet. The funding bill that was approved to end the impasse will last for only three weeks. During the shutdown, air traffic controllers were on the job, but NATCA President Paul Rinaldi told The New York Times it was still disruptive. “You can’t do any long-term planning,” he said. “They’re all focused on shutdown procedures. Today, you have a whole FAA that’s not working on anything that is modernizing our system. They’re all working on who’s exempt, who’s not exempt.”

  • Peter Maurer is retiring as CEO of Diamond Canada and moving to a new role in “senior global strategy and business development” according to a news release from the newly reunited Diamond Aircraft Industries.

  • The new federal tax law that took effect this month includes several provisions that will impact the various segments of general aviation, from private owners with small airplanes to corporations with their own fleet of jets. Buyers of business aircraft now can immediately write off the entire cost of their new or pre-owned aircraft. That’s good news for GA, says AOPA President Mark Baker.

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