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  • The EAA Pilot Proficiency Center (PPC) is now a regular feature of AirVenture, with presentations and simulators available for an hour of free, loggable dual instruction. The 23 different scenarios are posted on eaapilotproficiency.com, with all the briefing materials, so pilots at the show can arrive prepared.

  • ATP Flight School, in Florida, has ordered 15 Skyhawks to add to its training fleet, which already includes 115 of the airplanes, Textron Aviation announced this week at EAA AirVenture. Deliveries of the new Skyhawks, each equipped with Garmin G1000 NXi avionics and an angle-of-attack display, will begin in the third quarter. ATP's order supplements its 2016 purchase of 15 similarly equipped Skyhawks.

  • Three people were injured, two critically, when a Lake Renegade crashed on takeoff from the AirVenture Seaplane Base on Thursday.

  • Lt. Col. Harry T. Stewart (Ret.) stopped by AirVenture this year to sign autographs and share his story as a Tuskegee Airman.

  • Kitty Hawk, a California startup that made a splash—literally—with a man-carrying multi-rotor, recently brought its machine to AirVenture this week for demonstration flights. Although the first demo was winded out, Kitty Hawk co-founder Todd Reichert told AVweb in this video that the company views the Kitty Hawk as transitional technology. "This is step one in a much bigger vision. We are crossing this threshold, with computing, with battery technology and small lightweight sensors, this is now physically possible," Reichert said. "The use cases in the next five years are going to be incredibly diverse," he added.

  • Buyers who've been holding out for cheaper ADS-B Out hardware may want to check out what uAvionix introduced at AirVenture this week. It's a lightweight ADS-B Out that simply replaces a navigation light with a LED lamp and a miniaturized transceiver incorporated with an onboard blade antenna. See an AirVenture video report on the product here.

  • Attendees at Oshkosh headed over to the NASA pavilion and try their hand at docking the Orion spacecraft, NASA’s next-generation space vehicle. The simulator at Oshkosh is a simplified version of a system Lockheed Martin uses to test all the functions of Orion.

  • Stan Lee, known as the creator of comic-book heroes Spider-Man, the Hulk and the X-Men, arrived at Oshkosh on Friday to announce a partnership between his charitable foundation and EAA. The Stan Lee Foundation promotes literacy, education and the arts. Lee announced in a news conference on Boeing Plaza that he will work with EAA’s Young Eagles program to encourage young people to explore aviation and aeronautics.

  • A team of three high-school students from Alexandria, Virginia, won EAA’s $25,000 Founder’s Innovation Prize on Tuesday night, after a live judging event at the Theater in the Woods at Oshkosh. Their concept, titled “Remora System,” displays airspeed and angle of attack on a head-mounted display. A pod mounted under the wing provides the sensor inputs. Team member Justin Zhou said last year’s winner, Ihab Awad, was generous in helping them to prepare.

  • A remote tower system will be installed, tested and certified at the Northern Colorado Regional Airport, a general aviation field in Loveland, Colorado, Searidge Technologies, the vendor that will build the system, announced this week. The project will provide a test site for the technology, and will increase efficiency and safety at the airport, Searidge said.

  • After a two-year test program that started in September 2015, Richard Hogan’s Commuter Craft is prepping for ShipTwo, the second and final company aircraft before moving into an “alpha test” stage. ShipTwo is expected to be the final design as far as pilots are concerned, but the Cartersville, Georgia-based company plans to work with five experienced builders to test the build experience before unleashing their kit on the broader market in the fall of 2018.

  • The NTSB's final report on the fatal crash of an Icon A5 in a northern California lake in May is expected in the next few weeks and the speedy investigation was aided by information provided by the aircraft’s onboard flight data recorder.

  • If the aircraft diesel engine market lacks for anything other than buyers, it’s probably a high-horsepower engine suitable for high-performance single and twins. At AirVenture, Wisconsin-based Engineered Power System hopes to address that with its V-8 diesel that is just now beginning certification trials.

  • FAA Administrator Michael Huerta addressed the crowd at EAA AirVenture on Thursday, at Theater in the Woods, and reminded aircraft owners that time is running out to get equipped for ADS-B. “All aircraft flying in controlled airspace are going to need ADS-B by January 1, 2020,” he said. “That deadline hasn’t changed, and won’t change.” As many as 160,000 airplanes need to get equipped, and only 26,000 are currently in compliance, he said.

  • Inspired by the sight of two flying B-29s at Boeing Plaza this week, EAA said it’s ready to launch another bomber-restoration project, for the North American B-25 Mitchell in its museum collection, the Berlin Express. The aircraft, built in 1943, served during World War II, and later flew as an executive transport. In 1970, it appeared in the film Catch-22, then was bought by a collector. When the collector died a year later, the B-25 was donated to EAA.

  • Three years ago during AVweb’s Aero coverage, we reported on a new four-place training aircraft from the Italian company Vulcanair. This week at AirVenture, the company showed the airplane in the U.S. for the first time. The Vulcanair 1.0 looks a lot like a Cessna Skyhawk because it’s intended for the same market: training.

  • NBAA will hold its annual business aviation convention and exhibition in Las Vegas, October 10-12, the group announced this week. The event will feature 1,100 exhibits, 100 aircraft on static display, and plentiful opportunities for education and networking. Keynote speakers will be U.S. astronauts and identical twin brothers, Mark and Scott Kelly. They’ll headline the event’s second-day Opening General Session. "We are honored to welcome Mark and Scott Kelly to NBAA-BACE," said NBAA president Ed Bolen. "Their stories are truly remarkable aspects of America's aviation and aerospace history.”

  • Flight Design, which has been in receivership in Germany since February 2016, is now under new ownership, the company announced on Wednesday. Lift Air, from Eisenach, Germany, has taken over all assets and operation of the company. “I am glad that we are able to maintain the know-how of one of the world’s market leaders in the light aircraft sector and to secure it with a well-funded investor,” said Knut Rebholz, the insolvency administrator for the company, in a news release.

  • With a full line of aerodiesel engines in its product portfolio, Continental Motors says it’s seeing more uptake of Jet A-burning engines in the training market, including some nibbles in the North American market. At an AirVenture press conference on Tuesday, Continental’s Rhett Ross said that the company’s new CD-300 six-cylinder diesel is now fully certified and production ready.

  • All four people on board were killed Wednesday afternoon when a Beech A36 Bonanza crashed on a busy highway in Utah. Nobody on the ground was hurt, but the airplane narrowly missed several cars, according to local news reports. Two married couples from Utah were on board, and had taken off from Ogden-Hinckley Airport, about a half-mile from the I-15 freeway. The airplane had climbed to only about 300 feet when the engine made a “super loud sound,” witness Randy Paulson told KUTV.

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