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  • A Cessna wheel/float aircraft was being ferried from the lower 48 to Talkeetna Alaska. Upon arrival the pilot called the FSS station for landing information … FSS:"Altimeter 29.92, wind calm, runway 01 or 19, your choice … Pause … Cessna: “Which one is the longest?” … Tom Mackle  

  • There are many ways to ground an airplane and ramp attendants at what sounds like a U.S. airport (based on the profanity-laced epithets from one of the ground crew members) found a novel approach.

  • Lt. Col. Jason Heard, the commanding officer of the Air Force Thunderbirds, was removed from his post last week by Brig. Gen. Jeannie Leavitt, commander of the 57th Wing. Heard’s tenure with the USAF Air Demonstration Squadron was marred by a crash earlier this year in which a pilot providing a demonstration ride for a non-flying member of the team failed to go around following an unstabilized approach to a wet runway in Dayton, Ohio.

  • The U.S. Air Force has grounded its fleet of T-6 Texan II turboprops at Vance Air Force Base after a string of four hypoxia-like incidents in two weeks, according to the public affairs office of the 71st Flying Training Wing. This year has been a challenge for the U.S. military’s fighter community on the hypoxia front.

  • Expanded capabilities in Garmin’s G5 electronic flight instrument system have now been approved by the FAA and EASA, the company announced on Thursday. Owners of specific fixed-wing GA aircraft now can install the G5 in place of an existing directional gyro or horizontal situation indicator, Garmin said. In some panels, when paired with select VHF Nav/Comms or GPS navigators, the G5 also can be considered as the primary instrument for displaying magnetic heading, VOR/LOC guidance and/or GPS course guidance, as well as distance and groundspeed.

  • AVweb readers have good-naturedly borne with us the past few weeks as we've tweaked and modified to make AVwebFlash mobile optimized.

  • Officials at Airlander said this week their pre-production aircraft suffered “substantial damage” when it detached from its moorings on Nov. 18. As of Monday, the 300-foot-long aircraft was still “deflated and secure” on the edge of the airfield, where it landed, but it will be recovered and returned to Hangar 2 in Cardington, England, the company said. The aircraft is covered by insurance for up to 32 million pounds in damages.

  • Eight general aviation advocacy groups signed onto a letter this week protesting a bill now in the House that would put a cap on payments to veterans in flight-training programs. Other education tracks are not subject to caps, the advocates said. “Capping funds available for flight-training degree programs virtually guarantees that veterans seeking to use their GI Bill benefits to enter the aviation industry will have insufficient funds to achieve their goals,” says the letter.

  • A yearlong study by a consortium of university researchers has found that drone strikes are likely to inflict more damage on aircraft than strikes by birds of similar weight and speed, the FAA said this week. Commercial aircraft are designed to withstand bird strikes up to 8 pounds for the fuselage and 4 pounds for the windscreen, but they may be damaged by a drone strike of that weight, the researchers found.

  • The Santa Monica Airport, which the city has long tried to shut down while the aviation community has rallied to keep it open, will close for 10 days this month so the single 4,973-foot runway can be shortened. The shutdown will begin on Dec. 13 and conclude on Dec. 23, according to the airport website. The new runway will be just 3,500 feet long. Notams will be issued, and operators can find updated information on the airport website.

  • Thousands of people jump out of airplanes every day but a couple of wingsuit experts have managed to jump into an aircraft in flight after leaving the ground.

  • Cubcrafters has announced the latest upgrades to the experimental versions of its Carbon Cub adventure aircraft and they include an entirely new engine and a useful load equal to the plane’s empty weight.

  • Although the NTSB has yet to offer its own judgment, the builders of a replica of the Bugatti 100p that crashed in 2016, killing its main proponent, say they’ve concluded a clutch failure on the forward propeller assembly of the unusual aircraft led to its crash.

  • Airbus, Rolls-Royce and Siemens are partnering to build a partially electric-powered airliner demonstrator intended to provide the initial data toward developing a fully electric-powered passenger aircraft.

  • Textron will build a new clean-sheet-design large-utility twin turboprop, and have it ready for delivery by 2020, the company announced on Tuesday. The new airplane was developed with launch customer FedEx Express, which has long depended on Cessna Caravans for its delivery fleet. The Cessna SkyCourier 408 will have almost twice the cargo space of the Caravan 208 and will add a large cargo door to support container operations.

  • A pilot whose certificate was suspended when his L-39 sliced through powerlines crossing a canyon in Colorado in 2015 is now saying the utility company is to blame for damage and injuries that resulted from the incident

  • Whether the U.S.’s current political circumstances were the driving force or the theme was an afterthought, some skydivers in a remote area of the Southwest rode made a political statement with a modified hulk of a car for most of their trip back to earth after rolling it out of the back of a Shorts regional aircraft.

  • My friend was flying his Mooney 201 around the world. Needless to say, it was way over gross weight, flying with ferry tanks under a ferry permit.On departure from an Australian airport on a hot morning, he was only able to manage about a 200 FPM climb to his assigned altitude of 5,000 feet … Controller: “Do you want to continue your climb, or would you like to stop there and rest for a while?" ... Lars Perkins

  • The military aircraft accident rate has jumped significantly in the past year and Sen. John McCain has said it’s the natural result of years of penny pinching with the military. "Perhaps the greatest harm to our national security and our military is self-inflicted. I repeat self-inflicted," McCain, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said earlier this year on the senate floor. "We are killing more of our own people in training than our enemies are in combat.”

  • Photos shared with AVweb show the Cobalt Co50 Valkyrie undergoing flight testing at Hayward Executive Airport (KHWD) this summer before a test flight setback at Castle Airport (KMER) sidelined the newer of Cobalt’s two test aircraft. According to the NTSB preliminary report, after determining that the ailerons were not effective, the ATP-rated test pilot “reasoned that he would be able to land the airplane while configured at an increased airspeed using steady thrust control and the rudder for directional control.”

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